I talk a lot about gifts on this blog. It’s an expensive hobby but one I adore. Seeing the look of joy on someone’s face when they see a gift is just beautiful.

One of my favourite quotes is from Jarod Kintz, author of This Book Title is Invisible – “I don’t know what’s in the box, but I love it. Unopened gifts contain hope.”

But what about the message that goes with a gift? Or even the simple message of wishing someone a ‘happy birthday’, ‘congratulations’ or ‘thanks’ without a gift? In these days of texting or an easy Facebook timeline post saying “Happy birthday – have a great day”, have we lost the art of sitting down to write a card?

reused birthday card

This birthday card has been reused by two brothers for over 40 years (image source)

 

These two brothers may have taken the message in the card a bit too seriously. Clever? Yes. Original and written with love? Questionable. I applaud their running gag (except for the two years Jeff forgot to sign – tut tut Jeff).

There are some amazing cards out there. Some have beautiful designs, others hilarious cartoons or poignant messages.

k gets organised popsicle card

One of the beautiful designs from K Gets Organised

 

Lego card

I’ve given this Hallmark card to a number of friends – it cracks me up every time.

 

5th birthday cards

Miss T’s stash of cards from her birthday earlier this year

 

Then there’s the simple gift tag or notelet.

gift tags 3

Cute gift tags from Sprout and Sparrow

 

Miss T keenly makes her own cards, drawing pictures of the intended recipient plus adding a rainbow and some stickers for good measure. I like to encourage her creativity plus the time it takes her to make a card lets me enjoy a cup of tea while it’s still hot. Win-win.

I do love a great card design but the words inside are just as important. Sometimes I struggle to find the words and other times they gush out with ease. What’s important is that those words are personal.

When I see my tornadoes open a gift I always make sure they open the card first before attacking the wrapping paper. We look at the card and I read the words. They may not take it all in but someone has taken the time to write in it so it’s only fair! As they get older I’m sure they will appreciate the sentiment and time spent finding the perfect words to write.

Have we lost the art of giving handwritten cards?

Do you give cards with a gift? What type of cards do you love to give?

Do you keep your cards?